S.M.J. Rogge

Accurately determining the phase transition temperature of CsPbI3 via RPA calculations and phase-transferable machine learning potentials

T. Braeckevelt, R. Goeminne, S. Vandenhaute, S. Borgmans, T. Verstraelen, J.A. Steele, M. Roeffaers, J. Hofkens, S.M.J. Rogge, V. Van Speybroeck
Chemistry of Materials
34, 19, 8561–8576
2022
A1

Abstract 

While metal halide perovskites (MHPs) have shown great potential for various optoelectronic applications, their widespread adoption in commercial photovoltaic cells or photosensors is currently restricted, given that MHPs such as CsPbI3 and FAPbI3 spontaneously transition to an optically inactive nonperovskite phase at ambient conditions. Herein, we put forward an accurate first-principles procedure to obtain fundamental insight into this phase stability conundrum. To this end, we computationally predict the Helmholtz free energy, composed of the electronic ground state energy and thermal corrections, as this is the fundamental quantity describing the phase stability in polymorphic materials. By adopting the random phase approximation method as a wave function-based method that intrinsically accounts for many-body electron correlation effects as a benchmark for the ground state energy, we validate the performance of different exchange-correlation functionals and dispersion methods. The thermal corrections, accessed through the vibrational density of states, are accessed through molecular dynamics simulations, using a phase-transferable machine learning potential to accurately account for the MHPs’ anharmonicity and mitigate size effects. The here proposed procedure is critically validated on CsPbI3, which is a challenging material as its phase stability changes slowly with varying temperature. We demonstrate that our procedure is essential to reproduce the experimental transition temperature, as choosing an inadequate functional can easily miss the transition temperature by more than 100 K. These results demonstrate that the here validated methodology is ideally suited to understand how factors such as strain engineering, surface functionalization, or compositional engineering could help to phase-stabilize MHPs for targeted applications.

Open Access version available at UGent repository

How Reproducible are Surface Areas Calculated from the BET Equation?

J.W.M. Osterrieth, J. Rampersad, D. Madden, N. Rampal, L. Skoric, B. Connolly, M.D. Allendorf, V. Stavila, J.L Snider, R. Ameloot, J. Marreiros, C. Ania, D. Azevedo, E. Vilarrasa-Garcia, B.F. Santos, X.-H. Bu, Z. Chang, H. Bunzen, N.R. Champness, S.L. Griffin, B. Cheng, R.-B. Lin, B. Coasne, S. Cohen, J.C. Moreton, Y.J. Colón, L. Chen, R. Clowes, F.-X. Coudert, Y. Cui, B. Hou, D.M. D'Alessandro, P.W. Doheny, M. Dincă, C. Sun, C. Doonan, M.T. Huxley, J.D. Evans, P. Falcaro, R. Ricco, O. Farha, K.B. Idrees, T. Islamoglu, P. Feng, H. Yang, R.S. Forgan, D. Bara, S. Furukawa, E. Sanchez, J. Gascon, S. Telalović, S.K. Ghosh, S. Mukherjee, M.R. Hill, M.M. Sadiq, P. Horcajada, P. Salcedo-Abraira, K. Kaneko, R. Kukobat, J. Kenvin, S. Keskin, S. Kitagawa, K.-i. Otake, R.P. Lively, S.J.A. DeWitt, P.L. Llewellyn, B.V. Lotsch, S.T. Emmerling, A.M. Pütz, C. Martí-Gastaldo, N.M. Padial, J. García-Martínez, N. Linares, D. Maspoch, J.A. Suárez del Pino, P.Z. Moghadam, R. Oktavian, R.E. Morris, P.S. Wheatley, J. Navarro, C. Petit, D. Danaci, M.J. Rosseinsky, A.P. Katsoulidis, M. Schroeder, X. Han, S. Yang, C. Serre, G. Mouchaham, D.S. Sholl, R. Thyagarajan, D. Siderius, R.Q. Snurr, R.B. Goncalves, S. Telfer, S.J. Lee, V.P. Ting, J.L. Rowlandson, T. Uemura, T. Iiyuka, M.A. van der Veen, D. Rega, V. Van Speybroeck, S.M.J. Rogge, A. Lamaire, K.S. Walton, L.W. Bingel, S. Wuttke, J. Andreo, O. Yaghi, B. Zhang, C.T. Yavuz, T.S. Nguyen, F. Zamora, C. Montoro, H. Zhou, A. Kirchon, D. Fairen-Jimenez
Advanced Materials
34, 27, 2201502
2022
A1

Abstract 

Porosity and surface area analysis play a prominent role in modern materials science. At the heart of this sits the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) theory, which has been a remarkably successful contribution to the field of materials science. The BET method was developed in the 1930s for open surfaces but is now the most widely used metric for the estimation of surface areas of micro- and mesoporous materials. Despite its widespread use, the calculation of BET surface areas causes a spread in reported areas, resulting in reproducibility problems in both academia and industry. To prove this, for this analysis, 18 already-measured raw adsorption isotherms were provided to sixty-one labs, who were asked to calculate the corresponding BET areas. This round-robin exercise resulted in a wide range of values. Here, the reproducibility of BET area determination from identical isotherms is demonstrated to be a largely ignored issue, raising critical concerns over the reliability of reported BET areas. To solve this major issue, a new computational approach to accurately and systematically determine the BET area of nanoporous materials is developed. The software, called “BET surface identification” (BETSI), expands on the well-known Rouquerol criteria and makes an unambiguous BET area assignment possible.

Gold Open Access

Tunable Electrical Conductivity of Flexible Metal–Organic Frameworks

S. Chong, S.M.J. Rogge, J. Kim
Chemistry of Materials
34, 1, 254-265
2022
A1

Abstract 

We present the computational design of naphthalene diimide (NDI)-containing metal pyrazolate metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) [M(NDIDP), M = Zn, Co, and Fe] judiciously bestowed with both framework flexibility and electrical conductivity. M(NDIDP) MOFs exhibit “wine rack” type flexibility, allowing them to partake in pressure-induced structural transitions at low pressures and room temperature. The MOFs are also equipped with closely packed redox-active NDI moieties, which results in dispersive conduction band minima for efficient charge transport and conductivity. Remarkably, structural transitions of the designed MOFs are found to facilitate the rearrangement of NDI moieties. As a result, charge transport properties of M(NDIDP) MOFs can be finely tuned, which is evidenced by the gradual shift from one-dimensional to two-dimensional charge transport and up to 7.5-fold reduction in carrier effective mass (2.76m0–0.37m0) when transitioning between different structural configurations. The unprecedented discovery of flexible MOFs with tunable electrical conductivity arising from configuration-dependent charge transport behavior firmly establishes MOFs as versatile candidate materials for multifunctional electronics.

Perspectives on the influence of crystal size and morphology on the properties of porous framework materials

C. Hobday, S. Krause, S.M.J. Rogge, J.D. Evans, H. Bunzen
Frontiers in Chemistry
9, 772059
2021
A1

Abstract 

Miniaturization is a key aspect of materials science. Owing to the increase in quality experimental and computational tools available to researchers, it has become clear that the crystal size and morphology of porous framework materials, including metal-organic frameworks and covalent organic frameworks, play a vital role in defining the physicochemical behaviour of these materials. However, given the multiscale and multidisciplinary challenges associated with establishing how crystal size and morphology affect the structure and behaviour of a material – from local to global structural modifications and from static to dynamic effects – a comprehensive mechanistic understanding of size and morphology effects is missing. Herein, we provide our perspective on the current state-of-the-art of this topic, drawn from various complementary disciplines. From a fundamental point of view, we discuss how controlling the crystal size and morphology can alter the mechanical and adsorptive properties of porous framework materials and how this can impact phase stability. Special attention is also given to the quest to develop new computational tools capable of modelling these multiscale effects. From a more applied point of view, given the recent progress in this research field, we highlight the importance of crystal size and morphology control in drug delivery. Moreover, we provide an outlook on how to advance each discussed field by size and morphology control, which would open new design opportunities for functional porous framework materials.

Gold Open Access

Interfacial study of clathrates confined in reversed silica pores

P. M. Mileo, S.M.J. Rogge, M. Houlleberghs, E. Breynaert, J.A. Martens, V. Van Speybroeck
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
9(38), 21835-21844
2021
A1

Abstract 

Storing methane in clathrates is one of the most promising alternatives for transporting natural gas (NG) as it offers similar gas densities to liquefied and compressed NG while offering lower safety risks. However, the practical use of clathrates is limited given the extremely low temperatures and high pressures necessary to form these structures. Therefore, it has been suggested to confine clathrates in nanoporous materials, as this can facilitate clathrate's formation conditions while preserving its CH4 volumetric storage. Yet, the choice of nanoporous materials to be employed as the clathrate growing platform is still rather arbitrary. Herein, we tackle this challenge in a systematic way by computationally exploring the stability of clathrates confined in alkyl-grafted silica materials with different pore sizes, ligand densities and ligand types. Based on our findings, we are able to propose key design criteria for nanoporous materials favoring the stability of a neighbouring clathrate phase, namely large pore sizes, high ligand densities, and smooth pore walls. We hope that the atomistic insight provided in this work will guide and facilitate the development of new nanomaterials designed to promote the formation of clathrates.

Gold Open Access

Large-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal New Insights Into the Phase Transition Mechanisms in MIL-53(Al)

S. Vandenhaute, S.M.J. Rogge, V. Van Speybroeck
Frontiers in Chemistry
9, 718920
2021
A1

Abstract 

Soft porous crystals have the ability to undergo large structural transformations upon exposure to external stimuli while maintaining their long-range structural order, and the size of the crystal plays an important role in this flexible behavior. Computational modeling has the potential to unravel mechanistic details of these phase transitions, provided that the models are representative for experimental crystal sizes and allow for spatially disordered phenomena to occur. Here, we take a major step forward and enable simulations of metal-organic frameworks containing more than a million atoms. This is achieved by exploiting the massive parallelism of state-of-the-art GPUs using the OpenMM software package, for which we developed a new pressure control algorithm that allows for fully anisotropic unit cell fluctuations. As a proof of concept, we study the transition mechanism in MIL-53(Al) under various external pressures. In the lower pressure regime, a layer-by-layer mechanism is observed, while at higher pressures, the transition is initiated at discrete nucleation points and temporarily induces various domains in both the open and closed pore phases. The presented workflow opens the possibility to deduce transition mechanism diagrams for soft porous crystals in terms of the crystal size and the strength of the external stimulus.

Gold Open Access

Hydrogen Clathrates: Next Generation Hydrogen Storage Materials

A. Gupta, G.V. Baron, P. Perreault, S. Lenaerts, R.-G. Ciocarlan, P. Cool, P. M. Mileo, S.M.J. Rogge, V. Van Speybroeck, G. Watson, P. Van der Voort, M. Houlleberghs, E. Breynaert, J.A. Martens, J.F.M. Denayer
Energy Storage Materials
41, 69-107
2021
A1

Abstract 

Extensive research has been carried on the molecular adsorption in high surface area materials such as carbonaceous materials and MOFs as well as atomic bonded hydrogen in metals and alloys. Clathrates stand among the ones to be recently suggested for hydrogen storage. Although, the simulations predict lower capacity than the expected by the DOE norms, the additional benefits of clathrates such as low production and operational cost, fully reversible reaction, environmentally benign nature, low risk of flammability make them one of the most promising materials to be explored in the next decade. The inherent ability to tailor the properties of clathrates using techniques such as addition of promoter molecules, use of porous supports and formation of novel reverse micelles morphology provide immense scope customisation and growth. As rapidly evolving materials, clathrates promise to get as close as possible in the search of “holy grail” of hydrogen storage. This review aims to provide the audience with the background of the current developments in the solid-state hydrogen storage materials, with a special focus on the hydrogen clathrates. The in-depth analysis of the hydrogen clathrates will be provided beginning from their discovery, various additives utilised to enhance their thermodynamic and kinetic properties, challenges in the characterisation of hydrogen in clathrates, theoretical developments to justify the experimental findings and the upscaling opportunities presented by this system. The review will present state of the art in the field and also provide a global picture for the path forward.

Gold Open Access

Towards modeling spatiotemporal processes in metal–organic frameworks

V. Van Speybroeck, S. Vandenhaute, A.E.J. Hoffman, S.M.J. Rogge
Trends in Chemistry
3 (8): 605-619
2021
A1

Abstract 

Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are hybrid materials constructed from metal clusters linked by organic linkers, which can be engineered for target functional applications in, for example, catalysis, sensing, and storage. The dynamic response of MOFs on external stimuli can be tuned by spatial heterogeneities such as defects and crystal size as well as by operating conditions such as temperature, pressure, moisture, and external fields. Modeling the spatiotemporal evolution of MOFs under operating conditions and at length and time scales comparable with experimental observations is extremely challenging. Herein, we give a status on the modeling of spatiotemporal processes in MOFs under working conditions and reflect on how modeling can be reconciled with in situ spectroscopy measurements.

Gold Open Access

High-rate nanofluidic energy absorption in porous zeolitic frameworks

Y. Sun, S.M.J. Rogge, A. Lamaire, S. Vandenbrande, J. Wieme, C.R. Siviour, V. Van Speybroeck, J.-C. Tan
Nature Materials
20 (7), 1015–1023
2021
A1

Abstract 

Optimal mechanical impact absorbers are reusable and exhibit high specific energy absorption. The forced intrusion of liquid water in hydrophobic nanoporous materials, such as zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), presents an attractive pathway to engineer such systems. However, to harness their full potential, it is crucial to understand the underlying water intrusion and extrusion mechanisms under realistic, high-rate deformation conditions. Here, we report a critical increase of the energy absorption capacity of confined water-ZIF systems at elevated strain rates. Starting from ZIF-8 as proof-of-concept, we demonstrate that this attractive rate dependence is generally applicable to cage-type ZIFs but disappears for channel-containing zeolites. Molecular simulations reveal that this phenomenon originates from the intrinsic nanosecond timescale needed for critical-sized water clusters to nucleate inside the nanocages, expediting water transport through the framework. Harnessing this fundamental understanding, design rules are formulated to construct effective, tailorable and reusable impact energy absorbers for challenging new applications.

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