V. Van Speybroeck

Metal-organic frameworks as potential shock absorbers: the case of the highly flexible MIL-53(Al)

P.G. Yot, Z. Boudene, J. Macia, D. Granier, L. Vanduyfhuys, T. Verstraelen, V. Van Speybroeck, T. Devic, C. Serre, G. Ferey, N. Stock, G. Maurin
Chemical Communications
50, 9462-9464
2014
A1

Abstract 

The mechanical energy absorption ability of the highly flexible; MIL-53(Al) MOF material was explored using a combination of; experiments and molecular simulations. A pressure-induced transition; between the large pore and the closed pore forms of this solid; was revealed to be irreversible and associated with a relatively large; energy absorption capacity. Both features make MIL-53(Al) the first; potential MOF candidate for further use as a shock absorber.

Open Access version available at UGent repository

Generation of base catalytic activity in alkaline earth 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate MOFs via controlled selective decomposition of structural nitrate anions

P. Valvekens, D. Jonckheere, T. De Baerdemaeker, A. Kubarev, M. Vandichel, K. Hemelsoet, M. Waroquier, V. Van Speybroeck, E. Smolders, D. Depla, D. Roeffaers, D. De Vos
Chemical Science
5 (11), 4517-4524
2014
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Abstract 

A new concept has been developed for generating highly dispersed base sites on metal-organic framework (MOF) lattices. The base catalytic activity of two alkaline earth MOFs, M2(BTC)(NO3)(DMF) (M = Ba or Sr, H3BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide) was studied as a function of their activation procedure. The catalytic activity in Knoevenagel condensation and Michael addition reactions was found to increase strongly with activation temperature. Physicochemical characterization using FTIR, 13C CP MAS NMR, PXRD, XPS, TGA-MS, SEM, EPR, N2 physisorption and nitrate content analysis shows that during activation, up to 85 % of the nitrate anions are selectively removed from the structure and replaced with other charge compensating anions such as O2-. The defect sites generated via this activation act as new strong basic sites within the catalyst structure. A fluorescence microscopic visualization of the activity convincingly proves that the activity is exclusively associated with the hexagonal crystals, and that reaction proceeds inside the crystal’s interior. Theoretical analysis of the Ba-material shows that the basicity of the proposed Ba2+-O2--Ba2+ motives is close to that of edge sites in BaO.

First principle chemical kinetics in zeolites: The Methanol-to-Olefin process as a case study

V. Van Speybroeck, K. De Wispelaere, J. Van der Mynsbrugge, M. Vandichel, K. Hemelsoet, M. Waroquier
Chemical Society Reviews
43 (21), 7326-7357
2014
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Abstract 

To optimally design next generation catalysts a thorough understanding of the chemical phenomena at the molecular scale is a prerequisite. Apart from qualitative knowledge on the reaction mechanism, it is also essential to be able to predict accurate rate constants. Molecular modeling has become a ubiquitous tool within the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Herein, we review current computational procedures to determine chemical kinetics from first principles, thus by using no experimental input and by modeling the catalyst and reacting species at the molecular level. Therefore, we use the methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process as a case study to illustrate the various theoretical concepts. This process is a showcase example where rational design of the catalyst was for a long time performed on the basis of trial and error, due to insufficient knowledge of the mechanism. For theoreticians the MTO process is particularly challenging as the catalyst has an inherent supramolecular nature, for which not only the Brønsted acidic site is important but also organic species, trapped in the zeolite pores, must be essentially present during active catalyst operation. All these aspects give rise to specific challenges for theoretical modeling. It is shown that present computational techniques have matured to a level where accurate enthalpy barriers and rate constants can be predicted for reactions occurring at a single active site. The comparison with experimental data such as apparent kinetic data for well-defined elementary reactions has become feasible as current computational techniques also allow predicting adsorption enthalpies with reasonable accuracy. Real catalysts are truly heterogeneous in a space- and time-like manner. Future theory developments should focus on extending our view towards phenomena occurring at longer length and time scales and integrating information from various scales towards a unified understanding of the catalyst. Within this respect molecular dynamics methods complemented with additional techniques to simulate rare events are now gradually making their entrance within zeolite catalysis. Recent applications have already given a flavor of the benefit of such techniques to simulate chemical reactions in complex molecular environments.

Open Access version available at UGent repository

Flexibility versus rigidity: what determines the stability of zeolite frameworks? A case study

E. Verheyen, L. Joos, C. Martineau, C.J. Dawson, C. Weidenthaler, W. Schmidt, R. Yuan, E. Breynaerts, V. Van Speybroeck, M. Waroquier, F. Taulelle, M.M.J. Treacy, J.A. Martens, C. Kirschhock
Materials Horizons
Vol. 1 , 582 - 587
2014
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Abstract 

All silica COK-14/-COK-14 with OKO topology is the first case of a zeolite which reversibly transforms from a systematically interrupted to a fully connected state and back. Analysis of the opening/closing behavior allowed the study of entropy and framework flexibility as determinants for the stability of zeolite topologies, which, until now, has been experimentally inaccessible. Interconversion of the all-silica COK-14 zeolite with fully connected OKO topology and its -COK-14 variant with systematic framework interruption was investigated using high-temperature XRD, thermogravimetric analysis, Si-29 MAS NMR, nitrogen adsorption and a range of modelling techniques. Specific framework bonds in the OKO framework can be reversibly hydrolyzed and condensed. Structural silanols of the parent -COK-14, prepared by degermanation of the IM-12 zeolite, were condensed by heating at 923 K, and hydrolyzed again to the initial state by contacting the zeolite with warm water. Molecular modelling revealed an inversion of the relative stabilities for both variants depending on temperature and hydration. Condensation of the structural silanols in -COK-14 to COK-14 is entropy driven, mainly resulting from the release of water molecules. Framework reopening in the presence of water is spontaneous due to the high rigidity of the fully connected OKO framework. Isomorphous substitution was demonstrated as a viable option for stabilization of the fully connected OKO framework as this renders the closed framework flexible.

Insight into the Formation and Reactivity of Framework-Bound Methoxide Species in H-ZSM-5 from Static and Dynamic Molecular Simulations

J. Van der Mynsbrugge, S.L. Moors, K. De Wispelaere, V. Van Speybroeck
ChemCatChem
6 (7), 1906-1918
2014
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Abstract 

Framework-bound methoxides occur as intermediates in the stepwise mechanism for zeolite-catalyzed methylation reactions. Herein, the formation of methoxides from methanol or dimethyl ether in H-ZSM-5 is investigated by a combination of static and dynamic simulations, with particular focus on the effect of additional water and methanol molecules on the mechanism and kinetics. Metadynamics simulations allow partitioning the reaction path into distinct phases. Proton transfer from the zeolite to the reactants is found to be the rate-limiting phase in the methoxide formation. Additional methanol molecules only assist the proton transfer in the methoxide formation from methanol, whereas the reaction from dimethyl ether does not benefit from methanol assistance. Once formed, methoxides are found to be as reactive toward alkene methylation as methanol and dimethyl ether.

Metal-dioxidoterephthalate MOFs of the MOF-74 type: microporous basic catalysts with well-defined active sites

P. Valvekens, M. Vandichel, M. Waroquier, V. Van Speybroeck, D. De Vos
Journal of Catalysis
317, 1–10
2014
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Abstract 

The hybrid frameworks M2dobdc (dobdc4− = 2,5-dioxidoterephthalate, M2+ = Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+), commonly known as CPO-27 or MOF-74, are shown to be active catalysts in base-catalyzed reactions such as Knoevenagel condensations or Michael additions. Rather than utilizing N-functionalized linkers as a source of basicity, the intrinsic basicity of these materials arises from the presence of the phenolate oxygen atoms coordinated to the metal ions. The overall activity is due to a complex interplay of the basic properties of these structural phenolates and the reactant binding characteristics of the coordinatively unsaturated sites. The nature of the active site and the order of activity between the different M2dobdc materials were rationalized via computational efforts; the most active material, both in theory and in experiment, is the Ni-containing variant. The basicity of Ni2dobdc was experimentally proven by chemisorption of pyrrole and observation by IR spectroscopy.

Open Access version available at UGent repository

Nucleophile-Dependent Regio- and Stereoselective Ring Opening of 1-Azoniabicyclo-[3.1.0]hexane Tosylate

Mi-Kyung Ji, D. Hertsen, D.-H. Yoon, H. Eum, H. Goossens, M. Waroquier, V. Van Speybroeck, M. D'Hooghe, N. De Kimpe, H.-J. Ha
Chemistry - An Asian Journal
2014 (9), 1060-1067
2014
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Abstract 

1-[(1R)-(1-Phenylethyl)]-1-azoniabicyclo[3.1.0]hexane tosylate was generated as a stable bicyclic aziridinium salt from the corresponding 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)aziridine upon reaction with p-toluenesulfonyl anhydride. This bicyclic aziridinium ion was then treated with various nucleophiles including halides, azide, acetate, and cyanide in CH3CN to afford either piperidines or pyrrolidines through regio- and stereoselective ring opening, mediated by the characteristics of the applied nucleophile. On the basis of DFT calculations, ring-opening reactions under thermodynamic control yield piperidines, whereas reactions under kinetic control can yield both piperidines and pyrrolidines depending on the activation energies for both pathways.

Critical analysis of the accuracy of models predicting or extracting liquid structure information

M. Van Houteghem, A. Ghysels, T. Verstraelen, W. Poelmans, M. Waroquier, V. Van Speybroeck
Journal of Physical Chemistry B
118 (9), 2451–2470
2014
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Abstract 

This work aims at a critical assessment of properties predicting or extracting information on the density and structure of liquids. State-of-the-art NVT and NpT molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on five liquids: methanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran and ethanol. These simulations allow the computation of properties based on first principles, including the equilibrium density and radial distribution functions (RDFs), characterizing the liquid structure. Refinements have been incorporated in the MD simulations by taking into account Basis Set Superposition Errors (BSSE). An extended BSSE model for an instantaneous evaluation of the BSSE corrections has been proposed, and their impact on the liquid properties has been assessed. If available, the theoretical RDFs have been compared with the experimentally derived RDFs. For some liquids significant discrepancies have been observed and a profound but critical investigation is presented to unravel the origin of these deficiencies. This discussion is focused on tetrahydrofuran where the experiment reveals some prominent peaks completely missing in any MD simulation. Experiments providing information on liquid structure consist mainly of neutron diffraction measurements offering total structure factors as the primary observables. The splitting of these factors in reciprocal space into intra- and intermolecular contributions is extensively discussed, together with their sensitivity in reproducing correct RDFs in coordinate space.

Exploring the Vibrational Fingerprint of the Electronic Excitation Energy via Molecular Dynamics

A. Van Yperen-De Deyne, T. De Meyer, E. Pauwels, A. Ghysels, K. De Clerck, M. Waroquier, V. Van Speybroeck, K. Hemelsoet
Journal of Chemical Physics
140 (2014), 134105
2014
A1

Abstract 

A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed.

Tetravalent doping of CeO2: The impact of valence electron character on group IV dopant influence

D.E.P. Vanpoucke, S. Cottenier, V. Van Speybroeck, I. Van Driessche, P. Bultinck
Journal of the American Ceramic Society
97 (1), 258-266
2014
A1

Abstract 

Fluorite CeO2 doped with group IV elements is studied within the DFT and DFT+U framework. Concentration dependent formation energies are calculated for Ce1−xZxO2 (Z= C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, Ti, Zr, Hf) with 0≤x≤0.25 and a roughly decreasing trend with ionic radius is observed. The influence of the valence and near valence electronic configuration is discussed, indicating the importance of filled d and f shells near the Fermi level for all properties investigated. A clearly different behavior of group IVa and IVb dopants is observed: the former are more suitable for surface modifications, the latter are more suitable for bulk modifications.\\ \indent For the entire set of group IV dopants, there exists an inverse relation between the change, due to doping, of the bulk modulus and the thermal expansion coefficients. Hirshfeld-I atomic charges show that charge transfer effects due to doping are limited to the nearest neighbor oxygen atoms.

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